Tag: Mobile

CNBC: Facebook will open Watch to more creators, ramping up YouTube rivalry

CNBC: Facebook will open Watch to more creators, ramping up YouTube rivalry

When Watch launched last year, it was seen as Facebook’s long-awaited answer to YouTube, but with a platform that was different than Google’s in being largely built on TV-like content from publishers and entertainment brands. However, Watch has struggled to win over users, with many […]

Why Nike, Mars and others are taking influencer marketing in-house

Why Nike, Mars and others are taking influencer marketing in-house

Measuring the success and determining the ROI of influencer marketing campaigns have been major challenges for marketers, but investment in the space shows no sign of slowing. Digiday’s report underscores how more major brands like Mars and Nike are trying to get the most of […]

Clorox CMO: Voice and e-commerce will grow faster than marketers expect

Clorox CMO: Voice and e-commerce will grow faster than marketers expect

In a Q&A with Marketing Dive, Eric Reynolds dishes on why he’s bullish on a number of digital technology areas other CPGs have either stepped back from or might be considerably underestimating.

If one were to sum up The Clorox Company’s marketing outlook in one word, the word might be optimistic — even bullish — based on a conversation with CMO Eric Reynolds. This is a fairly sunny position to take as traditional packaged goods businesses reach a critical juncture, wrestling with Amazon and e-commerce generally, emergent technology like voice and widespread transparency issues plaguing digital media.

Rather than shying away from these channels, however, Reynolds largely sees rich opportunities for growth and learning. On the heels of Clorox’s sixth iConnect conference in San Francisco, an annual event where the brand brings together its executive team with a number of partners, platforms and fellow brands for insights-driven collaboration, he shared his biggest takeaways. Reynolds spoke on how they fit into Clorox’s 2020 Strategy, launched in 2013, of delivering long-term, profitable growth and innovation for a portfolio that includes the namesake wipes and bleach, along with products like Glad, Pine-Sol, Brita, Hidden Valley and Burt’s Bees.

“The death knell of any company, including CPGs, is being too inwardly focused,” he said of the inspiration behind iConnect, which this year had keynote speakers from companies as diverse as Alibaba and NatureBox. “IConnect is a catalyst that we use throughout the year to encourage people to go learn in the wild so that we don’t just become too referential. We say we love consumers, but are we really going out to see them? We love technology, do we really know what’s going on?”

In a wide-ranging Q&A with Marketing Dive, which has been condensed and edited for readability below, Reynolds made it clear that he sees a significantly bigger opportunity in e-commerce and voice than other CPGs might — Clorox is reportedly in talks with Amazon to sell Alexa audio ads — while also touching on other areas of digital like content and programmatic where the company is expanding:

MARKETING DIVE: The Clorox Company has been big on e-commerce, growing its business with the channel 50% two years ago. How did discussions around e-commerce play into iConnect and how does it fit into the company’s strategy more broadly in 2018?

REYNOLDS: The e-commerce content of iConnect is actually going up over time, with some of our key customers coming to the conference like Walmart, Target, Kroger, Amazon and others. Our entire e-commerce team was there. That reflects how we see that more consumers will soon find it not extraordinary to purchase everyday items through digital shelves.

“People say: ‘Why would you put many times more resources on e-commerce when it’s 5% of sales?’ Because we think it’s going to be a quarter of sales faster than people think.”

In a Q&A with Marketing Dive, Eric Reynolds dishes on why he’s bullish on a number of digital technology areas other CPGs have either stepped back from or might be considerably underestimating.

If one were to sum up The Clorox Company’s marketing outlook in one word, the word might be optimistic — even bullish — based on a conversation with CMO Eric Reynolds. This is a fairly sunny position to take as traditional packaged goods businesses reach a critical juncture, wrestling with Amazon and e-commerce generally, emergent technology like voice and widespread transparency issues plaguing digital media.

Rather than shying away from these channels, however, Reynolds largely sees rich opportunities for growth and learning. On the heels of Clorox’s sixth iConnect conference in San Francisco, an annual event where the brand brings together its executive team with a number of partners, platforms and fellow brands for insights-driven collaboration, he shared his biggest takeaways. Reynolds spoke on how they fit into Clorox’s 2020 Strategy, launched in 2013, of delivering long-term, profitable growth and innovation for a portfolio that includes the namesake wipes and bleach, along with products like Glad, Pine-Sol, Brita, Hidden Valley and Burt’s Bees.

“The death knell of any company, including CPGs, is being too inwardly focused,” he said of the inspiration behind iConnect, which this year had keynote speakers from companies as diverse as Alibaba and NatureBox. “IConnect is a catalyst that we use throughout the year to encourage people to go learn in the wild so that we don’t just become too referential. We say we love consumers, but are we really going out to see them? We love technology, do we really know what’s going on?”

In a wide-ranging Q&A with Marketing Dive, which has been condensed and edited for readability below, Reynolds made it clear that he sees a significantly bigger opportunity in e-commerce and voice than other CPGs might — Clorox is reportedly in talks with Amazon to sell Alexa audio ads — while also touching on other areas of digital like content and programmatic where the company is expanding:

MARKETING DIVE: The Clorox Company has been big on e-commerce, growing its business with the channel 50% two years ago. How did discussions around e-commerce play into iConnect and how does it fit into the company’s strategy more broadly in 2018?

REYNOLDS: The e-commerce content of iConnect is actually going up over time, with some of our key customers coming to the conference like Walmart, Target, Kroger, Amazon and others. Our entire e-commerce team was there. That reflects how we see that more consumers will soon find it not extraordinary to purchase everyday items through digital shelves.

“People say: ‘Why would you put many times more resources on e-commerce when it’s 5% of sales?’ Because we think it’s going to be a quarter of sales faster than people think.”

 

marketingdive.com

Facebook ads cost 43% more in Q4 as users spent less time on site

Facebook ads cost 43% more in Q4 as users spent less time on site

CEO Mark Zuckerberg used the conference call with analysts to impress upon the business community how serious it is about changing the News Feed experience in ways that aim to improve people’s well-being and society overall. For marketers, the big takeaway is that it’s getting […]

Marketing Trends in 2018

Marketing Trends in 2018

2017 was the year the industry got its much-needed wake-up call. The question now isn’t whether marketers can fix a broken system but how they’ll make it better. Polish must be applied to brands’ strategies in 2018 — with a loss of growth likely where it’s […]

Post ID: 567

“Dilly dilly,” a nonsensical phrase prominently featured in Bud Light’s current advertising campaign, has become a viral meme success for the brand thanks to TV commercials, social media integrations and mentions on shows and live events, The New York Times reported. The phenomenon strongly echoes the ubiquity of Budweiser’s “Whassup?” tagline from the late ’90s.

Debuting last August and made with the agency Wieden + Kennedy, the creative depicts a medieval courtroom where various banquet attendees gift their king Bud Light, followed by praises of “dilly dilly.” Those that instead offer beverages like spiced mead wine are sent to a “pit of misery.”

The virality of “dilly dilly” can be attributed to Bud Light knowing its audience well and sending them the right message at the right time — namely around football games — but no one involved in its creation expected it to spread so rapidly, according to the Times. The well-received marketing effort arrives at a critical time for the beverage brand, whose parent company AB InBev underwent an executive shuffle in November amid a long period of declining sales for key products like Budweiser and Bud Light.

The virality of “dilly dilly” can be attributed to Bud Light knowing its audience well and sending them the right message at the right time — namely around football games — but no one involved in its creation expected it to spread so rapidly, according to the Times. The well-received marketing effort arrives at a critical time for the beverage brand, whose parent company AB InBev underwent an executive shuffle in November amid a long period of declining sales for key products like Budweiser and Bud Light.

Part of Bud Light’s struggles might stem from the growing popularity of craft beers, which the “dilly dilly” creative takes direct shots at by punishing the banquet attendees who offer fancier alternatives to Bud Light like spiced mead wine. This echoes a series of ads the company also rolled out in August that emphasize the brew’s simplicity while ribbing beers that are overly complex. “Dilly dilly” might be at the top of everyone’s tongues, but it will be interesting to see whether the phrase’s success translates to a much-needed sales boost.

read more at marketingdive.com

marketingdive.com